INVEST IN YOUR HEALTH

Did you know the energy conservation movement in the late 1970s impacted residential construction in the U.S. and dictated homes be constructed as “air tight?”

While this has reduced energy costs, it has come at a price for our health. The number of children with asthma has risen from 2.5 million in 1982 to 4.4 million in 1996, an increase of 75 percent. A growing amount of research suggests poor indoor air quality may be a key factor.

Over the last 20 or so years, experts have figured out recirculating the same indoor air causes multiple health problems. Homes and offices are in need of positive pressure, which forces indoor air out through cracks in flooring, walls, and ceilings. Positive pressure makes it harder for moisture to get in and it forces contaminants in air out of the home or office.

 
 
 

YOUR HEALTH IS WORTH IT

Indoor air quality is essential for a long and healthy life. AirCheck One's testing provides all of the information you need to determine the health of your home's air and our fresh air systems are the only ones on the market that can provide medical grade fresh air to an entire residence.

 
Forty-four percent of all allergy and asthma triggers are found inside the home.
 
Ninty percent of your life is spent indoors.
 
Seventy-two percent of chemical exposure is received at home.
 

WHY HAS INDOOR AIR QUALITY DECLINED?

During the 1970s, the global use of energy became an important political and economic topic due to the energy crises that took place in that decade. Subsequently, the cost of heating and cooling of air in buildings increased and changes in construction techniques took place.

Many buildings were retrofitted with insulation, vapor barriers, and new, tighter windows and doors. New building construction techniques were developed to decrease the amount of heat transfer through walls and windows and reduce the volume of air infiltration or exchange through walls, windows, and doors.

As a result, the buildup of contaminants and moisture inside buildings that had previously provided a healthy environment became an issue.

Sick Building Syndrome is now a common label used for headaches, eye irritations, nasal irritations, fatigue and other symptoms that can be correlated to time spent inside a specific building or room.

Building Related Illness refers to a specific diagnosable illness whose cause can be traced to a particular building or room. Legionnaire's disease is an example of a Building Related Illness.

 

HEALTH SYMPTOMS OF A “SICK HOME OR OFFICE”

While every member of your family or your employees have different sensitivities to the indoor air, AirCheck One conducts comprehensive testing to investigate, evaluate, and report issues. Our recommendations, based on our findings, will turn a “sick home or office” into a “healthy home or office.”

Symptoms most commonly reported of a sick home and office, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are listed below. Use the diagnostic checklist chart to identify signs and symptoms associated by various pollutants.

 

HEALTH SYMPTOMS OF A “SICK HOME OR OFFICE”

While every member of your family or your employees have different sensitivities to the indoor air, AirCheck One conducts comprehensive testing to investigate, evaluate, and report issues. Our recommendations, based on our findings, will turn a “sick home or office” into a “healthy home or office.”

Symptoms most commonly reported of a sick home and office, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are listed below. Use the diagnostic checklist chart to identify signs and symptoms associated by various pollutants.

 

DIAGNOSTIC QUICK REFERENCE

 
Signs and Symptoms
Environmental Tobacco smoke
Other Combustion Products
Biological Pollutants
Volatile Organics
Heavy Metals
Sick Building Syndrome
Respiratory
Rhinitis, nasal congestion
Epistaxis
Pharyngitis, cough
Wheezing, worsening asthma
Dyspnea
Severe lung disease
Other
Conjunctival
Headache or dizziness
Lethargy, fatigue, malaise
Nausea, vomiting, anorexia
Cognitive impairment, personality change
Rashes
Fever, chills
Tachycardia
Retinal hemorrhage
Myalgia
Hearing loss
 
1. Associated especially with formaldehyde
2. In asthma
3. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, Legionnaires’ Disease
4. Particularly associated with high CO levels
5. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, humid fever
6. With marked hypersensitivity reactions and Legionnaires’ Disease

SOURCE: GOVERNMENT EPA

 

INDOOR AIR POLLUTION IS AMONG THE TOP FIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS TO PUBLIC HEALTH.

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